proseandpassion
pennyfornasa:

In Saturn’s Rings is a ground-breaking IMAX film that will take viewers on a stunning tour of our Solar System. The film is created from over 1 million real photographs taken by the Cassini spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope, among other NASA missions. Using a filmmaking technique called photoanimation, the film will provide audiences with the most authentic experience of what space travel is really like without the use of CGI. Watch the 4K trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJjeo2Br2AYThis film would not be possible without all the stunning photos captured by the Cassini spacecraft over the last decade. Last year Cassini faced budget cuts that could have ended its extended mission prematurely. Write Congress today and tell them to fund the Cassini mission through 2017: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/Follow In Saturn’s Rings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/insaturnsringsmovieVisit their website for more information: http://www.insaturnsrings.com/

pennyfornasa:

In Saturn’s Rings is a ground-breaking IMAX film that will take viewers on a stunning tour of our Solar System. The film is created from over 1 million real photographs taken by the Cassini spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope, among other NASA missions. Using a filmmaking technique called photoanimation, the film will provide audiences with the most authentic experience of what space travel is really like without the use of CGI. Watch the 4K trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJjeo2Br2AY

This film would not be possible without all the stunning photos captured by the Cassini spacecraft over the last decade. Last year Cassini faced budget cuts that could have ended its extended mission prematurely. Write Congress today and tell them to fund the Cassini mission through 2017: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

Follow In Saturn’s Rings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/insaturnsringsmovie
Visit their website for more information: http://www.insaturnsrings.com/

txchnologist

Barren Bubble-like Zones Could Help Untangle Universe’s Mysteries

txchnologist:

image

by Marcus Woo, Inside Science

Sometimes nothingness can reveal a whole lot.

While the universe is mostly empty, it contains bubble-like voids that are even emptier, taking up most of the space in the cosmos. And new research shows that these voids all look similar regardless of size — a consistency that may help unravel some of the universe’s biggest mysteries.

If you zoom way out, all the matter in the universe looks like a huge cobweb, consisting of an expansive network of filaments and wall-like structures that crisscross one another.

More than 80 percent of this matter is dark matter, the invisible and mysterious stuff that appears to interact only gravitationally with the regular matter that makes up stars and galaxies. Residing in these filaments and walls of dark matter are galaxies, and the densest regions — where the filaments intersect — are sites of massive clusters of hundreds to thousands of galaxies.

Read More

specsthespectraldragon

Every star is a sun as big, as bright, as our own. Just imagine, how far away from us you’d have to move the sun to make it appear as small and faint as a star. The light from the stars travels very fast. Faster than anything. But not infinitely fast. It takes time for their light to reach us. For the nearest ones, it takes years. For others, centuries. Some stars are so far away it takes eons for their light to get to Earth.

By the time the light from some stars gets here they are already dead. For those stars, we see only their ghosts. We see their light, but their bodies perished long, long ago.

- Episode 5: A Sky Full Of Ghosts, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

thedemon-hauntedworld
thedemon-hauntedworld:

Face-on spiral galaxy NGC 3982
NGC 3982 is located about 68 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The galaxy spans about 30,000 light-years, one-third of the size of our Milky Way galaxy. This colour image is composed of exposures taken by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The observations were taken between March 2000 and August 2009. The rich colour range comes from the fact that the galaxy was photographed invisible and near-infrared light. Also used was a filter that isolates hydrogen emission that emanates from bright star-forming regions dotting the spiral arms.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Face-on spiral galaxy NGC 3982

NGC 3982 is located about 68 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The galaxy spans about 30,000 light-years, one-third of the size of our Milky Way galaxy. This colour image is composed of exposures taken by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The observations were taken between March 2000 and August 2009. The rich colour range comes from the fact that the galaxy was photographed invisible and near-infrared light. Also used was a filter that isolates hydrogen emission that emanates from bright star-forming regions dotting the spiral arms.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

distant-traveller
distant-traveller:

The oldest cluster in its cloud


This image shows NGC 121, a globular cluster in the constellation of Tucana (The Toucan). Globular clusters are big balls of old stars that orbit the centres of their galaxies like satellites — the Milky Way, for example, has around 150.



NGC 121 belongs to one of our neighbouring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). It was discovered in 1835 by English astronomer John Herschel, and in recent years it has been studied in detail by astronomers wishing to learn more about how stars form and evolve.
Stars do not live forever — they develop differently depending on their original mass. In many clusters, all the stars seem to have formed at the same time, although in others we see distinct populations of stars that are different ages. By studying old stellar populations in globular clusters, astronomers can effectively use them as tracers for the stellar population of their host galaxies. With an object like NGC 121, which lies close to the Milky Way, Hubble is able to resolve individual stars and get a very detailed insight.
NGC 121 is around 10 billion years old, making it the oldest cluster in its galaxy; all of the SMC’s other globular clusters are 8 billion years old or younger. However, NGC 121 is still several billions of years younger than its counterparts in the Milky Way and in other nearby galaxies like the Large Magellanic Cloud. The reason for this age gap is not completely clear, but it could indicate that cluster formation was initially delayed for some reason in the SMC, or that NGC 121 is the sole survivor of an older group of star clusters.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowlegement: Stefano Campani

distant-traveller:

The oldest cluster in its cloud

This image shows NGC 121, a globular cluster in the constellation of Tucana (The Toucan). Globular clusters are big balls of old stars that orbit the centres of their galaxies like satellites — the Milky Way, for example, has around 150.

NGC 121 belongs to one of our neighbouring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). It was discovered in 1835 by English astronomer John Herschel, and in recent years it has been studied in detail by astronomers wishing to learn more about how stars form and evolve.

Stars do not live forever — they develop differently depending on their original mass. In many clusters, all the stars seem to have formed at the same time, although in others we see distinct populations of stars that are different ages. By studying old stellar populations in globular clusters, astronomers can effectively use them as tracers for the stellar population of their host galaxies. With an object like NGC 121, which lies close to the Milky Way, Hubble is able to resolve individual stars and get a very detailed insight.

NGC 121 is around 10 billion years old, making it the oldest cluster in its galaxy; all of the SMC’s other globular clusters are 8 billion years old or younger. However, NGC 121 is still several billions of years younger than its counterparts in the Milky Way and in other nearby galaxies like the Large Magellanic Cloud. The reason for this age gap is not completely clear, but it could indicate that cluster formation was initially delayed for some reason in the SMC, or that NGC 121 is the sole survivor of an older group of star clusters.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowlegement: Stefano Campani

sagansense

myampgoesto11:

Photographic soap bubble studies by Santiago Betancur Z  that look like planets  

Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces

Watch this beautiful collaboration between Santiago Betancur Z and musician Julian De La Chica

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