astrodidact
thedemon-hauntedworld:

Spiral Galaxy NGC 3344
NGC 3344 is a glorious spiral galaxy around half the size of the Milky Way, which lies 25 million light-years distant. We are fortunate enough to see NGC 3344 face-on, allowing us to study its structure in detail.
The galaxy features an outer ring swirling around an inner ring with a subtle bar structure in the centre. The central regions of the galaxy are predominately populated by young stars, with the galactic fringes also featuring areas of active star formation.
Central bars are found in around two thirds of spiral galaxies. NGC 3344’s is clearly visible here, although it is not as dramatic as some (see for example heic1202).
Credit: NASA/Hubble

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Spiral Galaxy NGC 3344

NGC 3344 is a glorious spiral galaxy around half the size of the Milky Way, which lies 25 million light-years distant. We are fortunate enough to see NGC 3344 face-on, allowing us to study its structure in detail.

The galaxy features an outer ring swirling around an inner ring with a subtle bar structure in the centre. The central regions of the galaxy are predominately populated by young stars, with the galactic fringes also featuring areas of active star formation.

Central bars are found in around two thirds of spiral galaxies. NGC 3344’s is clearly visible here, although it is not as dramatic as some (see for example heic1202).

Credit: NASA/Hubble

christinetheastrophysicist
christinetheastrophysicist:

A Nearby Hypervelocity Star
Title: The First Hypervelocity Star from the LAMOST Survey
Authors: Zheng Zheng et. al.
In 1988, Jack Hills predicted the existence of a star whose velocity was greater than the escape velocity of the galaxy. Such a star, a hypervelocity star (HVS), was first discovered in 2005. Since then, about 20 hypervelocity stars have been found. Recently, another HVS was found using the LAMOST survey. This is the closest HVS that we currently know.
This HVS, known as J091206.52+091621.8, or LAMOST-HVS1, is the first hypervelocity star to be discovered with the LAMOST survey. The star has an apparent magnitude of 13, which is brighter than Pluto. LAMOST-HVS1 is an early B-type star with a strong helium presence. Comparing to our Sun, LAMOST-HVS1 is larger, brighter, and hotter.
LAMOST-HVS1 is found in the same area as the other known HVSs. The data gathered on the star suggests that it originated near the galactic center. With further measurements, the exact origin of LAMOST-HVS1 can be identified.
Image: An artist’s impression of a hypervelocity star (Credit: Ben Bromley, University of Utah)

christinetheastrophysicist:

A Nearby Hypervelocity Star

In 1988, Jack Hills predicted the existence of a star whose velocity was greater than the escape velocity of the galaxy. Such a star, a hypervelocity star (HVS), was first discovered in 2005. Since then, about 20 hypervelocity stars have been found. Recently, another HVS was found using the LAMOST survey. This is the closest HVS that we currently know.

This HVS, known as J091206.52+091621.8, or LAMOST-HVS1, is the first hypervelocity star to be discovered with the LAMOST survey. The star has an apparent magnitude of 13, which is brighter than Pluto. LAMOST-HVS1 is an early B-type star with a strong helium presence. Comparing to our Sun, LAMOST-HVS1 is larger, brighter, and hotter.

LAMOST-HVS1 is found in the same area as the other known HVSs. The data gathered on the star suggests that it originated near the galactic center. With further measurements, the exact origin of LAMOST-HVS1 can be identified.

Image: An artist’s impression of a hypervelocity star (Credit: Ben Bromley, University of Utah)

sabertoothsarecool

vacilandoelmundo:

“So you’re made of detritus [from exploded stars]. Get over it. Or better yet, celebrate it. After all, what nobler thought can one cherish than that the universe lives within us all?”

―Neil deGrasse Tyson

These photos are on the shortlist for Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014, a competition and exhibition run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich. The winning images will be posted here on September 18.